austenchanted:

He took her hand; - whether she had not herself made the first motion, she could not say - she might, perhaps, have rather offered it - but he took her hand, pressed it, and certainly was on the point of carrying it to his lips - when, from some fancy or other, he suddenly let it go. Why he should feel such a scruple, why he should change his mind when it was all but done, she could not perceive. He would have judged better, she thought, if he had not stopped. The intention, however, was indubitable; and whether it was that his manners had in general so little gallantry, or however else it happened, but she thought nothing became him more. It was with him, of so simple, yet so dignified a nature. She could not but recall the attempt with great satisfaction. It spoke such perfect amity. He left them immediately afterwards - gone in a moment.

"Alex, no! Please, come back!”

"The segment in which Mr. Knightley humbles Emma is also critical to the novel because she weep after hearing Mr. Knightley’s words. The tears signify her shame over realizing the erros of her ways. They are also a sign of her growing love for him." - Marc Di Paolo

"The hottest boring accounting guy this summer.”

pemberleyintern:

Fun fact about EA ep. 57: Joanna and Brent came up with “The hottest boring accounting guy this summer (oontz oontz oontz)” and “You just called me hot” while they were on set.

"Mr. Knightley himself would be doing nothing to assist the cure;—not like Mr. Elton. Mr. Knightley, always so kind, so feeling, so truly considerate for every body.."

"His tall, firm, upright figure, among the bulky forms and stooping shoulders of the elderly men, was such as Emma felt must draw every body’s eyes; and, excepting her own partner, there was not one among the whole row of young men who could be compared with him.”

"I know how highly you think of Jane Fairfax," said Emma. Little Henry was in her thoughts, and a mixture of alarm and delicacy made her irresolute what else to say.

"Yes," he replied, "any body may know how highly I think of her."

"And yet," said Emma, beginning hastily and with an arch look, but soon stopping—it was better, however, to know the worst at once—she hurried on—”And yet, perhaps, you may hardly be aware yourself how highly it is. The extent of your admiration may take you by surprize some day or other.”

starponds